FILM IN 140 PANEL SERIES: SOCIAL MEDIA AND FILMMAKING – A NECESSARY UNION?

Film Threat’s next Film in 140 Panel on Twitter will take place on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 from 9-10pm EST. Our topic is “Social Media and Filmmaking: A Necessary Union?” If Web 1.0 was all about Ecommerce, Web 2.0 is about connecting with people before the commerce takes place. The most cost efficient way to do this is through using social media, but we know that many filmmakers are not accustomed to the new challenge of connecting directly to their audience rather than letting advertising and film critics do the talking, so we are going to ask a few people involved in filmmaking tell you how they started, how they use the different sites, which ones work for them and how you can get started too.

Primarily this discussion is for social media newbies, but we think there will be some information included for everyone, no matter their level of skill. Tools change every day with new developments and capabilities so the learning process is ongoing.

FOLLOW ALONG

  1. Follow along at TweetChat or TwapperKeeper. Both of these sites will be set up to follow and archive the #filmin140 hashtag, but we STRONGLY recommend using TweetChat for the best panel experience (it auto-adds the hashtag and the feed auto-refreshes, allowing for easy panel following).
  2. Search for the hashtag #filmin140 on Twitter.com. The official questions posed to, and answers given by, the panelists will be marked with this hashtag, and you will also be able to read comments by anyone else who ends their Tweets with this hashtag. This is the same as the unmoderated feed above

ASK QUESTIONS

  1. Ask your question via tweet, and end with the hashtag #filmin140. Not all questions will get answered, but we will be actively monitoring the hashtag.
  2. If you wish to follow along and monitor the questions yourself, you can search for the hashtag #filmin140, or follow along at TweetChat or TwapperKeeper.

CONTINUE THE CONVERSATION
After the official time is up, the conversation can continue, it just will no longer be moderated or monitored. Simply continue using the #filmin140 hashtag with your tweets and talk to the panelists, or other audience members, as long as you’d like.

ARCHIVES
Each panel will be archived as a transcript on Film Threat for later reading. The archive for the last panel, “Do You Hulu? Getting Your Film On iTunes, Netflix And Other Big-Name Platforms” can be found here and all Film in 140 panels and related articles can be found here.

STAY UPDATED
If you want to know what the next panel topic will be, who the panelists are or want to keep track of any changes or updates to the panel process, follow Filmin140Panel on Twitter. You can also follow panel organizers Film Threat, Sheri Candler and Charles Judson, as we’ll be updating info via our feeds as well (plus, we talk a lot, so maybe you’ll wind up enjoying our feeds for something more than panel information).

If you’d like to educate yourself on the potential differing opinions on the panel, “Social Media and Filmmaking: A Necessary Union?”, we will be adding informational links shortly. Check back with us heading up to the panel start date, as we update this page with new links whenever possible, and prepare to join in on the discussion on Wednesday, October 26, 2011 from 9-10pm EST!

PANELISTS

  • Jesse Averna, (@Dr0id)
    Jesse Averna is an Emmy Winning editor including clients such as Disney, Warner Bros, ESPN, MTV, the Tony Awards, American Movie Classics, TIME.com, PBS The News Hour, TED, New York Fashion Week, Music Choice, as well as international nonprofits. He also had the privilege of collaborating with Jim Henson, SAG, and Stella Adler professionals. Last year, Jesse wrapped post production working as First Assistant Editor on Director Brad Anderson’s new feature, Vanishing On 7th Street. His most recent work has been as the Editor for Sesame Street this season and last.

    Jesse co founded and hosts the Twitter discussion panel for editors and post production professionals called #postchat to discuss issues, ideas and knowledge sharing of the post production process. Follow him on twitter @Dr0id

  • Jocelyn Towne, (@jocelyntowne)
    Writer/director/actor of “I Am I.” Jocelyn was born and raised in Los Angeles, attended Crossroads School for the Arts & Sciences and got her B.A. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley. She also studied dance at the Alvin Ailey School in New York. She got her first production assistant job at 17 on Jon Amiel’s film, “Copycat,” and continued to work as a p.a. for various indie films and commercials. Graduating after three years from UC Berkeley, she moved back to Los Angeles and attended the Meisner based Baron/Brown conservatory for two years. Having been a p.a. and wanting to get more experience on the set, Jocelyn worked for five months as a stand-in on Almost Famous, an incredible learning experience watching and participating in Cameron Crowe’s rehearsals with his actors and watching the amazing John Toll at work. In 2001, Jocelyn got a job as a reader for Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris. She helped them to find “Little Miss Sunshine.” In 2004 she joined the Antaeus Academy Company, a classical theatre group based in North Hollywood. As an actor she has had the pleasure of working with some of Los Angeles’ most talented theatre directors, and also several wonderful film/television directors, including Joel Zwick on “Elvis Has Left the Building,” Barbara Kopple on “Havoc” and Bob Odenkirk on an HBO pilot, “Derek & Simon.” She recently completed work in two films, now both in post-production, “The Loop,” starring Rachel Nichols, and “The Selling.”



Posted on October 26, 2011 in Features, Film in 140 by
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