FAMILY FUNDAMENTALS

3 Stars
Year Released: 2002
MPAA Rating: Unrated
Running Time: 75 minutes
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This film has not yet been reviewed. Check back later for the complete review here on FilmThreat.com. Synopsis: Sundance veteran documentarian Arthur Dong (“Licensed to Kill,” “Coming Out Under Fire”) returns with a timely and incisive film about the untenable conflict between warring American values–religious fundamentalism versus family love.

While fundamentalists from outside the Unites States are castigated these days for their social extremism, this film shines a new light on American fundamentalism, a powerful ideological bloc in the U.S. Among the documentary’s subjects are a Pentecostal church leader and her gay grandson and lesbian daughter; the gay son of a Mormon bishop in rural Utah; and Brian Bennett, the gay former chief of staff to conservative (and Catholic) Congressman Bob Dornan (R-California), who regarded Bennett almost as a son.

It’s not surprising that American contempt for homosexuality has strong roots in religious fundamentalism, but as Dong’s film demonstrates, family members facing the challenge of warring beliefs require, and summon, great personal resourcefulness in attempting to remain functional families. Attending prayer meetings in which intervention is sought to correct gayness and a son’s homecoming that becomes a family intervention, Dong traces tortuous tactics undertaken by parents and children, including sham marriages and other forms of self-abnegation.

Such contortions are shown for their dubiousness as cultural solutions for families or society, with polarization and extremism as conceivable outcomes. (Indeed, the intelligent and articulate Dornan is stretched thin by the pain of his conflict over Bennett, finally appearing to resolve his conflict without resorting to compromise). Noting the false comforts of negotiated silence, this film frames a message of caution and issues a call for the sort of open debate that respectfully allows citizens, and families, to agree to disagree.



Posted on December 10, 2001 in Reviews by
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